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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 17, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can — blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year — the youngest victim was 14—year—old jaden moodie, from east london. for the first time in the uk, doctors have successfully used keyhole surgery to treat a baby with spina bifida inside womb. it was a very high risk pregnancy from the start anyway — through being told i couldn't have babies and everything.
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one of the world's leading experts calls for testosterone replacement therapy to be made widely available to menopausal women. we are preventing women from being mistreated by products that aren't for women. there's not going to be a tsunami of women wanting testosterone. good morning — welcome to bbc newsroom live. in the last hour, jeremy corbyn has written to the prime minister to tell her that talks to find a compromise agreement for leaving the european union have "gone as far as they can", blaming the splits within the government. he says in the letter "the increasing weakness and instability of your government means there cannot be confidence in securing whatever might be agreed between us. as i said when we met on tuesday evening, there has been growing
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concern in both the shadow cabinet and parliamentary labour party about the government's ability to deliver on any compromise agreement." our political correspondent jonathan blake is at westminster. we knew this was coming but it's an important day. it certainly is. no more life in that tortuous at times talks process that's been going on for six weeks now so. in an attempt to try to find a compromise that both sides could be happy with and both sides could be happy with and both sides could sell to their parties. in order to win a vote in the house of commons. but although, as you say and as mister corbin acknowledges in the letter, there we re acknowledges in the letter, there were significant areas of agreement between the tories and labour on the detail of the policy, it is perhaps the political reality that stopped the political reality that stopped the two sides being able to do a deal that they would be able to bring their parties on board with. not least because on the labour side there are many labour mps who would
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like to see a confirmatory vote, another referendum, as part of any deal with government, and deep uneasiness as well among labour mps about doing a deal with the tories when they may well end up with a new leader injust a when they may well end up with a new leader in just a few months' time who could rip the whole thing up and start again. and on the conservative side, deep uneasiness about even talking to labour and potentially doing a deal, and on the issue of the customs union with the eu, a key labour demand, well we saw last week how many conservative mps would regard that as a step too far. so it isjeremy regard that as a step too far. so it is jeremy corbyn regard that as a step too far. so it isjeremy corbyn who has taken a step and pulled the plug on these talks and said they have gone as far as they can. he ends the letter by saying that he will look constructively at any proposal is the government brings to break the brexit deadlock and try to get something through the house of commons, but then goes on to say that without significant changes labour will continue to oppose the
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prime minister's deal. so it is effectivelyjeremy corbyn saying, your move now but we are done with the process. is not clear that it is her move, because that is my next question, we have a tory leadership campaign in offing. yes, it has been done officially under way for weeks now, with mrs may's position increasingly precarious in downing street. but with her confirmation yesterday that after parliament get another vote on her deal in the first full week ofjune she will set a timetable for departure which if she loses the vote i we can expect to kicking pretty immediately. people are throwing their hat into the ring fast, and jostling to win the ring fast, and jostling to win the admiration and support and votes of conservative mps then also the wider grassroots tory membership across the uk who will select the final wear. we have three of those contenders out and about, officially
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confirming they are in the contest, borisjohnson, former confirming they are in the contest, boris johnson, former foreign secretary, confirming yesterday that absolutely will have a shot at the job he is fancied for so long, and then a couple of other hats in the rain, esther mcvey, their work and pensions secretary, has said she would like a shot at being prime minister, and a relative newcomer to the cabinet, the new international development secretary has been casting for support as well. so in addition to those three there are several other familiar names and faces in the cabinet who may or may not officially at some point be a pa rt not officially at some point be a part of this contest. but all of them with leadership ambitions, the environment secretary michael gove, leader of the is andrea led some, penny mordaunt the new defence secretary, the home secretary, the
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foreign secretary, and the chief secretary to the treasury. it's a very long list but over the next few weeks and months it will be whittled down to two by conservative mps and then the wider membership across the uk will select their new leader and with that the country's new prime minister. 100 people have been stabbed to death in the uk so far this year — that's according to figures obtained by bbc news from police forces across the country. the largest group of victims are men in their 20s, as our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, reports. 100 crime scenes, 100 lost lives. we have been tracking murder and manslaughter in britain in 2019 and the knife is the most—used murder weapon. charlotte huggins became the first stabbing victim on new year's day in south london. on average, there was a knife murder or manslaughter nearly every day and a half that followed. each face represents a devastated family and an expensive murder inquiry. this is a crime disproportionately
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affecting young people. nearly a third of victims were under 30. nearly a fifth were under 20, and that is a huge worry for the police and youth workers. in the west midlands, knife crime has risen 96% since 2013, with eight fatal knife attacks this year, along with manchester and london the highest rate in the country. here, they say, violent crime has moved beyond just those involved in gangs. it is across all people now, and we're seeing what used to be a small act of violence, perhaps a slap or a punch, turn into something far more serious. but two promising signs. in 95 of the 100 cases, someone has been arrested and in london the metropolitan police recently released figures suggesting a 10% fall in knife crime resulting in an injury.
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tom symonds, bbc news. joining me in the studio is ben wintour, co—founder of steel warrior, a charity which melts downs knives and turns then into outdoor gym equipment. and from birmingham, i'm alsojoined by david jamieson — the police and crime commissioner for the west midlands. thank you both forjoining us. one of the things about this story is just how enormous the impact is brought home by seeing the faces of all the victims. we have on our website today the story of the individual victims, website today the story of the individualvictims, many website today the story of the individual victims, many of them, and as you can see from the story, a lot of victims predominantly in their 20s and 30s. if you keep going
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down... if you click on each of the individual photos you get to the story of the victim and of the particular case, the circumstances. each of these cases also has an update on whether charges stand, if any. coming back, then, to the discussion today, ben, let's talk to you. do you feel the enormous focus we have seen on stabbings since the beginning of the year, particularly with the death of jayden so early in the year and so young at 1a, to think we have a need to get on top of it now? i hope so. the issue is a
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growing one and one that is very aware of at the moment and i think whilst many brilliant initiatives are coming out to solve the issue much more needs to be done. and what you think needs to be done?” much more needs to be done. and what you think needs to be done? i don't think there is one single way of solving it, ithink think there is one single way of solving it, i think it starts with home, family is encouraging their children to obviously not carry a knife, but there is also a way of more emphasis needs to be put on preventing the motives for carrying knives, and the two motives we have seen a protection and bravado. so the way we are trying to get behind thatis the way we are trying to get behind that is how can we give young people more physical confidence to walk the streets unharmed 7 more physical confidence to walk the streets unharmed? let's put that to david. you are police and crime commission of the west midlands. do you think those two factors are the key ones, protection and bravado, that are driving young people carry knives? they are certainly two of
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the factors. can i say, it really is devastating to say we are talking 110w devastating to say we are talking now about the 100th person who has died this year from knife crime, and in addition to those you mention, the people in their 205 and 305, some are actually very young, early teen5, both perpetrators and victim5, teen5, both perpetrators and victims, and that is a profound concern to us all. what we are looking at, along with tough and robu5t policing, which is an e55ential robu5t policing, which is an essential part of this, and we have upped the patrol5 essential part of this, and we have upped the patrols in many key areas in the west midlands, and i've been talking constantly to the chief con5table about this, not just talking constantly to the chief con5table about this, notju5t in the last few weeks and months but we've been having an ongoing di5cu55ion we've been having an ongoing discussion for some years in the we 5t discussion for some years in the west midlands, because we saw a pattern of increasing violence over a period of time. but the work we mu5t a period of time. but the work we must do now is with those youngsters who are now 12, 13, 14. they are the one5 who are now 12, 13, 14. they are the ones who in the future could be involved in some of these serious
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crime5. involved in some of these serious crimes. and we heard ben talking about work in the home, is that something you feel is where the focus should be or do you think it should be in schools? focus should be or do you think it should be in 5chool5?|j focus should be or do you think it should be in schools? i think it is both. i think parent5, should be in schools? i think it is both. i think parents, of course, have a lot to contribute here as well. talking to their children about the fears they have. some children, particularly boy5, about the fears they have. some children, particularly boys, have been found to have blades, knives on their possession because they think they will protect themselves from it. they don't necessarily want to use it but i think it is for protection. whereas what they should know what we are doing in schools is saying to them that knife in 40% of cases will be used against you and against somebody else. it is that type of thing is to be done, so it is home and school, getting that understanding. but also in the wider community, and getting some of the youth activity going. here are the
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we st youth activity going. here are the west midlands, i seen in the last few years youth work disappear with austerity and cuts from local authorities. now we are picking up the problems there on this epidemic is partly caused by the lack of good quality tea diversionary work for young people. do you agree? completely. 0ften young people. do you agree? completely. often the focus has been on government solving these issues whereas i think we'll have a civic responsibility to try to solve this issue and brands do as well and we've been working with the co—op who have been recently supporting us as well as other pro bono partners across the country who have noticed this is such a big issue and so many people can play roles even if they think they are slightly withdrawn from the issue itself to prevent it. so, viewers, this morning, what you think we should be doing?”
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so, viewers, this morning, what you think we should be doing? i think volunteering is a great thing to do if you believe in one method to solving knife crime i think you should find a cause you believe in andi should find a cause you believe in and i think you should try to be pa rt and i think you should try to be part of that. i think innovation and innovative techniques as a way of solving the issue should be embraced. concretely, what would be an innovative technique that results ina an innovative technique that results in a helpful way to knife crime?” would like to think the way we have gone about solving the issue is a slightly different one, melting down knives and turning them into gems. it is slightly different. it certainly gets people putt attention and gets them talking about the issue. and often talking about the issue. and often talking about the issueis issue. and often talking about the issue is one of the key means to preventing it as well. david, one last word from you, what is the thing you would like our viewers to ta ke thing you would like our viewers to take away and think about hard? thing you would like our viewers to take away and think about hard7m isa take away and think about hard7m is a local problem and you are right, people can volunteer, things like street watch here where local
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volunteers are working. perhaps volunteering to help some youth groups in the area may be another where they can do it. on the way here to the studio i went past the knife angel, 100,000 knives that have been confiscated by the police across the country or found in surrender boxes, that is a good way of focusing people's attention as well. come and look at that and then say from that, what will we actually do about it? and i would say to government as well they have put £100 million of funding in, i welcome it and it is a good thing and we're making good use of it, but i say to government, this is not a one—year problem, this is something we have to be tackling year on year, so we have to be tackling year on year, so put the resource in, notjust for this year but make sure that forces like mine which are facing most of the challenge get the proper funding year—on—year for the next five, ten years and not a quick fix for the for the next few months. david and ben, thank you both very much.
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well 2019's 100 fatal stabbings in the uk have been documented on the bbc news website. the page is updated as police investigations into the killings progress and when court proceedings get underway. for the first time in the uk, doctors have successfully used keyhole surgery to repair the spine of a baby with spina bifida while it was still inside the womb. the operation was performed by a team at king's college hospital in london. they say the procedure isn't a cure, but improves the baby's chances and is saferfor the mother than invasive surgery. the condition can lead to paralysis and affect bladder and bowel control. here's our health and science correspondent, james gallagher. baby jaxson is just a few weeks old,
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but more than two months ago, he had pioneering surgery on his spine. doctors operated onjaxson while he was still inside his mother's womb. his mum, sherrie, said it was a shock to find out he had spina bifida. it was a very high—risk pregnancy from the start anyway, through being told i couldn't have babies, and everything. so any decision we've had to make, i've made it purely for the fact that he is meant to be here. you know, it's — he'sjust — he's fought every day. it was these pregnancy scans that showed jaxson‘s spine and spinal cord were not developing properly. spina bifida can lead to paralysis and affect bladder and bowel control, but surgery in the womb can reduce the risk of complications later in life. we are operating on very delicate structures. the foetus nerves, that they are exposed, the foetus itself is very small, and we are operating on a foetus inside the womb, so obviously it's
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a very delicate operation. this is how it works. three small incisions were made in sherrie's bump. a thin camera and small surgical tools were inserted into her womb, then surgeons put the spinal cord back in place and put a patch over the wound. jaxson needed to be looked after in neonatal intensive care when he was born. he has not been cured, but his family hope they have given him the best start in life. he has a lot of movement in his legs, which we were told he'd have minimal movement if he didn't have the surgery, or none at all, he wouldn't be able to move them at all. i've got high hopes for him. from day one he's done things, he's amazed us all. the headlines on bbc news: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can — blaming the government's weakness
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for their collapse. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year. the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie from east london and in sport, danny rose says he was embarrassed after a club said they wa nted embarrassed after a club said they wanted to meet him to check he wasn't crazy. the tottenham and england defender said it happened when he spoke to an unnamed club about a potential transfer last summer. it came after he had opened up summer. it came after he had opened up about struggling with depression. israel folau has been officially sacked by rugby australia, he was suspended last month after a social media post saying hell awaits gay people. he was found to have committed i have a breach of the players could of conduct. and brooks koepka is the man to catch at the
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pga championships in new york. he leads on seven under par. tommy fleetwood is a leading brit. he is four shots back in third. i'll be back on those stories after half past. as we come to the end of our special week dealing with issues around the menopause, one of the world's leading experts is calling for testosterone replacement therapy to be made widely available to women who need it. the treatment isn't currently licensed for doctors to prescribe to menopausal women. john maguire has more.
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sophie claus was in her early 30s when she started the menopause after a hysterectomy. i just felt like i'd gone from being a 32—year—old to being 80, like, overnight. as part of the hormone replacement therapy, along with oestrogen, she was given testosterone, most often associated with men but also a vital female hormone. my libido had completely disappeared after surgery, and that's come back. for me, it was just kind of that lifeline. and with the oestrogen and testosterone, i've gone back to where i'm functioning kind of as i was before — slightly a bit more fatigued and forgetful still, but i kind of feel a lot more like my old self again. however, it is a treatment that many doctors are reluctant to prescribe. at the moment, using testosterone to treat the symptoms of the menopause is unlicensed, but a major international conference featuring almost 900 gynaecologists here in berlin wants that to change. there are a lot of women being treated with male formulations, which are severalfold too much, and compound therapies, which are sort of ad hoc prescriptions. by providing a product for women, we're preventing women from being mistreated by products that aren't for women. there's not going to be a tsunami
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of women wanting testosterone. what we are going to do is make available a product for women who are already being treated. like all hrt, it is not suitable for every patient, but many here believe it is a treatment that could make a real difference to so many women's lives. next week will mark two years since the bomb at manchester arena which killed 22 people. the youngest victim was 8—year—old saffie roussos, who was at the concert with her mum lisa. lisa was badly injured in the attack, but after extensive surgery and rehabilitation she is preparing to walk the route of the great manchester run this weekend. alongside her husband andrew, she has given her first broadcast interview to our north of england correspondent judith moritz.
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i don't really remember a lot. i remember leaving, and saffie had got my hand, this hand, and she was pulling, jumping about. my arm was outstretched, holding her hand as she was pulling me, and the next minute ijust hit the floor with a thud. ijust remember lying there and trying to move. i was just phys — i was just paralysed. i couldn't move a finger, i couldn't move at all. i could blink. ijust kept thinking to myself, just keep your eyes open. and when somebody finally spoke to me and started moving me, they asked me my name, and ijust said saffie. that's all i could get out. i wanted to say, will you just go and find saffie? then i must have gone again, because the next time, i remember them cutting myjeans off, and that was the last thing i remembered until i woke up. how many weeks later? six weeks. six weeks later. what happened at that point? andrew was with you. andrew was with me, and i can remember thinking, well, why has he not mentioned saffie?
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and i knew, ijust knew. i thought, if i'm this badly hurt, and she was a tiny eight—year—old, then what chance would she have? like an intuition? yes. did you ask the question? i said, she's gone, isn't she? it's a painful moment. i can't talk about it. because it is so raw, and it is two years on. it makes no difference at all, does it? no, it doesn't. still like yesterday. yeah. i feel like we're stuck in 2017. yeah, you do. it's amazing how these two years have gone by, but when sometimes we talk amongst each other, you're stuck in 2017.
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and for you over the last two years, balancing your bereavement, your loss, with your recovery, how have those two things been possible? ifelt like i needed to be strong, and i needed to be the best i could be before i could deal with the loss of saffie. i had to learn to walk again. the first few steps around the ward, i felt like i'd run a marathon, didn't i? i was out of breath, sweating. it was only about five steps. the hand, i think the progress is a lot slower with my hand. that's been reconstructed ? it's been reconstructed, yes. there's still a lot of numbness in it, and nerve damage. taking part in the great manchester run has given you a goal, has it? for training? yes, it's let me look further into the future than i normally do.
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and it's the start of the charity, the launch of the charity, so it's all good and positive. a charity needs to be there to help victims of terrorism. there's no help. do you feel let down, lisa? yeah. by the government, definitely. it was offered — £5,500 each for the death of saffie. through the compensation scheme? through the compensation scheme, that's the maximum. it's a complete insult. taking part in the run in manchester, how will that feel, do you think, being back here? i know it's going to be emotional, not just for me, for all of us that's walking. but it's a good thing, and we need — we need it, don't we? something good's got to come out of something so awful. it's got to.
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coverage of the great manchester run will be presented by gabby logan, live on bbc2 from 12pm on sunday, with a highlights programme to follow at 5pm. more than two—thirds of lgbt people say they've been sexually harassed at work, but most don't report it. the survey by the tuc is believed to be the first major study into lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender people's experiences in the workplace. the government says it's starting a consultation on harassment and will ensure employers understand their legal responsibilities. 0ur lgbt correspondent ben hunte has more. patrick works in the public sector where he went through years of sexual harassment just because he is gay. i was stopped from attending an away day with colleagues. i was told that it was because the male staff were too afraid to share a shower. the teasing, discrimination and abuse that happened at the start of his career still impact him years later. i suffer from anxiety. i get very anxious. and it's just horrible.
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it's horrendous. and patrick is not alone. according to new research by the trades union congress, 68% of lgbt people say they have been sexually harassed at work. 42% of those surveyed said colleagues had made unwelcome comments or asked unwelcome questions about their sex life. 27% had received unwelcome sexual advances, and two—thirds didn't tell their employers. we need employers to step up to the mark and to take on a duty. we think it should be a legal duty to prevent sexual harassment happening in the first place. there's lots they could do in terms of policy, working with unions and educating people. i've spoken to several lgbt people who say they are not surprised by the findings in this report. in the uk, we have laws that protect people from discrimination based on their sexuality, but when it comes to applying those to workplaces, clearly more clearly needs to be done. it had a massive impact. whilst patrick has spoken up, many more lgbt people are still struggling in silence.
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ben hunte, bbc news. let's speak now to quinn roache, lgbt policy officer for the tuc. why do you think this is happening? there are lots of factors but one of the clearest ones is the sexualisation of the lgbt identity, so what that is is people think of lg bt so what that is is people think of lgbt people so what that is is people think of lg bt people being so what that is is people think of lgbt people being about sex rather than relationships and proper adult engagement. so is it clear that the harassment that the lgbt community experience in the workplace is worse than harassment of people who are not lg bt? than harassment of people who are not lgbt? we didn't really do that kind of comparison. what i can tell you is that any sexual harassment in the workplace is too much, and the report adds to the body of evidence about what sexual harassment is. and
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when we think about this we need to think about that it's not a pie, focusing on lg bt think about that it's not a pie, focusing on lgbt equality doesn't mean there is less equality for someone else. it means there is better treatment of everyone if we address treatment of lgbt people and women and straight people as well. the issue in the report about reporting to employers, that a lot of people are not reporting, why do you think that is? one of the really interesting statistics is that of those who do not report, one in four have not reported because they do not want to out themselves as lgbt. so that is a huge barrier. in one of the leading causes around reporting and underreporting. so one of the things that you want is to put a duty on employers in relation to this issue, can you explain more about that? as it stands now it is
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up about that? as it stands now it is up to the victim of sexual harassment to bring their complaint forward to seekjustice. we think should happen is the government should happen is the government should introduce a duty for employers to prevent it from happening in the first place. and that duty would be underpinned by a code of conduct, so employers would know exactly what they need to do to comply. thank you very much. i think we have time for one more. why don't you enlarge on that a bit, explain to us what would be in that code of conduct. if i am an employer what will i need to do? that is still to be fleshed out. what we would like to see is exact steps around reporting and employers taking steps to stop the abuse happening in the workplace, so reinforcing that positive workplace culture so people aren't harassed in the first place. thank you very much
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for joining the first place. thank you very much forjoining us. now it's time for a look at the weather, with simon king. we have some sunshine today in england and northern parts of scotland. it will start cloudy further south. we will see some sunshine developed across northern ireland, as well. it is in southern parts of wales and england that we will still see some showers. further north, there will be some sunshine and temperatures getting up to 19 or 20 degrees in the west of scotland. through this evening and tonight, more cloud and outbreaks of rain will move its way into scotland, a few showers in eastern areas through this evening and tonight and temperatures down to between nine
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and 11 celsius, so not a cold night. for the weekend, it will remain cloudy and cool. there will be some sunshine, but also the risk of some showers just about everywhere, really. temperatures will start to rise as we go through sunday. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can — blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year, the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie from east london. for the first time in the uk, doctors successfully use keyhole surgery to treat a baby with spina
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bifida inside the womb. it was a very high risk pregnancy from the start anyway — through being told i couldn't have babies and everything. one of the world's leading experts calls for testosterone replacement therapy to be made widely available to menopausal women we are preventing women from being mistreated by products that aren't for women. there's not going to be a tsunami of women wanting testosterone. sport now. here's jane dougall. good morning. danny rose says that a club wanted to meet him to check he wasn't "crazy", after the tottenham and england defender revealed he had been struggling with depression. rose says it happened when he spoke to an un—named club about a potential transfer last summer. he was talking as part of a special bbc one programme
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about men's mental health, alongside the duke of cambridge, thierry henry and peter crouch. i do think there's still a long way to go in football, because in the summer i was speaking to another club, and they said the club would like to meet you, you know, just to check that you're not crazy. really? sorry, we are going to leave that and go over to listen tojeremy corbyn he is explaining why the brexit talks have broken down. have the talks achieved anything? the government has not moved this position fundamentally and there are fundamental disagreements. we want a customs arrangement with the european union that protects jobs and trade. we put those views very strongly to the government and the
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withdrawal agreement bill will be brought forward. i don't know what the contents of that bill will be we haven't seen it. how far have you discussed what indicative route should be put to parliament? very little. we were only informed that they were thinking of indicative foods earlier this week and at that stage they couldn't tell us what they would be. this is a novel process which we will look at whenever it comes to parliament. at the fundamental issues have to be protection ofjobs, trade relations with the european union and protection of rights at work, the environment and consumer protections and the access to important european agencies. there are reports this morning that you did discuss indicative boots in detail, including on what the common spitefuljob in regards to a customs union. they put forward views that they would bring these indicative foods forward. we will vote on how
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they fit with labour policy, but the issue has to be that the government has fundamentally shifted its view and the government is negotiating with no authority and no ability that i can see to deliver any of this. if the government could see a way forward through an indicative vote on a series of measures looking at the customs union, is not something that labour will go along with? provided that customs union has a permanent nature about it, so we can guarantee oui’ has a permanent nature about it, so we can guarantee our relations in the future, otherwise the danger to manyjobs in this country, too much trade in this country, is absolutely huge. they have not been able to give us that guarantee, other than there would be prepared to discuss a temporary customs union. there were reports that one of the other indicative boots would be to effectively rule out a second referendum. is that something you
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favour? no. 0ur referendum. is that something you favour? no. our policy agreed at last yea r‘s conference favour? no. our policy agreed at last year's conference and supported by the vast majority of labour party members and mps is that we will be prepared to take the public mood when there is something to take to the public vote. in these talks there is nothing to take there yet. how would you instruct your mp5 to vote that there was an indicative vote that there was an indicative vote to rule out a referendum? would you instruct them to vote against that? we would not rule out a second referendum, but i wouldn't be a referendum, but i wouldn't be a referendum in 2016 terms, it would be on referendum in 2016 terms, it would beona referendum in 2016 terms, it would be on a new deal, a catastrophic exit from the european union. be on a new deal, a catastrophic exit from the european unionm looks like there is been an deal on some kind of how the parliament moves forward. no, there has not been a deal done at all. we entered these talks in good faith. i asked for the talks in the first place last september, and i did so because i felt parliament had to break the logjam in some way. we have negotiated in good faith and very
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seriously and put forward a lot of very detailed arguments on trade relations, and i think that is the responsible thing to do, but the reality is we cannot leave the eu without an agreement, therefore the government must recognise that has to come to a position that contains oui’ to come to a position that contains our customs and trade relationship with the european union. the other indicative of being talked about this morning would be one that showed the commons which supports leaving the eu by the 31st ofjuly. would you pack such an amendment? i don't think it is credible to say that we will get all the parliamentary agreement and all stages of a very controversial and major bill through parliament by the end ofjuly, so no, we wouldn't support that. do you think the parliamentary process has also run out of road, then? the suggestion is that theresa may thinks that is the way out of the impasse, will you
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agree? well, she will be prime minister for very agree? well, she will be prime ministerfor very much agree? well, she will be prime minister for very much longer anyway. we will put our views to parliament on trying to get an agreement with the european union. we have done this very seriously, including talks with a number of european prime ministers, the commission and michel barnier, the chief negotiator. many labour voters are deserting you because they feel that you haven't delivered on your promise of the 2017 election to deliver brexit, and now is the time to step up to the plate and see if there is a parliamentary process that can move things forward. there has to be a parliamentary process because ultimately only parliament can decide on this. our message has been however you voted in 2016, you are faced with austerity, universal credit problems, all kinds of social injustice issues in britain. we appeal to people however they voted in 2016 to have a sensible and serious relationship with the european union in the future. labour
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is the party that wants to bring people together and challenge the discordant voices of the far right that are hell—bent on dividing our society. the only way forward for any country is unity of purpose to conquer social injustice. finally, could you do business with the more brexit leaning conservative prime minister? if borisjohnson becomes the leader, for example, could you talk to him? who ever the tory party decide is going to be their leader, we will put our case and we will challenge them. we will challenge them to ensure we get that relationship with europe, but also on all the issues of social injustice, lack of investment, lack of housing in this country, because thatis of housing in this country, because that is what the labour party stands for. you have said that talks ended, tipping ever really happen seriously or was it your shadow boxing? tipping ever really happen seriously or was it your shadow boxing7m tipping ever really happen seriously or was it your shadow boxing? it was in shadow boxing. i asked for the
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talks last september. the prime minister eventually invited me to come and meet her to start this process after the deadline had passed. we have negotiated seriously in them and my team has worked extremely hard and extremely responsibly on this. we have not reached an agreement with the government, therefore the issue has to go back to parliament. ok, thanks a lot. so, the labour leader there explaining why the final nail has gone into the coffin of the cross— party gone into the coffin of the cross—party talks on brexit. jonathan blake is at westminster for us. what struck you about his narrative in ending the talks? you heard there a sense of the frustration thatjeremy corbyn and those negotiating on his behalf or labour with the government have felt throughout this process, that is that there is almost been a running commentary by other senior government figures, not necessarily those involved in the talks, about the prospect of what was being discussed and whether it would
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endure in the future, or could potentially be be ripped up and discarded by whoever takes over from theresa may. we have seen some of those potential candidates weighing into the —— weighing into the debate with potentially unhelpful remarks. that is sojeremy corbyn sees it. that is sojeremy corbyn sees it. that has been a big factor in his decision to pull the plugs on these talks. nevertheless, he conceded there were areas of agreement with there were areas of agreement with the government. he said these were serious discussions, but ultimately the two sides were able to come to an agreement and do a deal. adding to that the political reality that whatever agreement was done would be very difficult to sell to both the liberal party mps and the conservative mps here at westminster. i think you have the inevitable conclusion that these talks have ended without an agreement. he said several times they are that the issue has to come back to parliament, but despite the reports we have this morning that
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there was a discussion between theresa may and jeremy corbyn perhaps and how that process would work, it is not clear at this stage. downing street is saying that on the subject of indicative boots, the prime minister prospect spokesman said we are considering our next steps. jonathan, thank you very much. it's just under a week to go now until voters go to the polls in the european elections. campaigning is gearing up with the main parties up and down the country. phil mackie is in dudley, where the brexit party is holding an election rally. yes, there has been a rally this morning. the brexit campaign bus is just heading away now to its next goal. nigel farage was greeted by several hundred supporters and well—wishers. he has done a tour of the indoor market here. this is solid brexit country. it voted solidly to leave in the referendum.
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when he was head of ukip, they did very well here. i spoke to him briefly while he was on his walkabout and they asked about the allegations that emerged last night that he had received a good deal of private funding from our banks in the year after the referendum. he said essentially he hadn't. i asked him abouta said essentially he hadn't. i asked him about a trip to america that was a p pa re ntly him about a trip to america that was apparently paid for by mr banks, he said none of your business. i asked him about how the brexit party is being funded. is that it is purely through voluntary donations, people sign up and they pay £25. i asked him if that could be properly scrutinised, could be manipulated, particularly by people overseas, but he said no, they had good systems in place. then i spoke to him about what we have just been hearing about, the breakdown of talks between the conservatives labour party. the next date is the 31st of
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0ctober. what i am saying is that if the brexit party can win these elections next week and leave them well, leaving with no deal is back on the table. i demand we have representation in those negotiations because we have a democratic mandate to do so. i think mrs may will be gone within a few weeks. we mayjust get a prime minister who for fear of the brexit party says we are leaving on the 31st regardless. essentially, he was talking to the converted today. i did talk to some people who were holding up the brexit party posters, they have previously voted for labour, some ukip. nigel farage said he is that we would even lead leave on the 31st. he says that only a big
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mandate for his party will get things going at westminster. and remember that all this week we've been interviewing representatives from parties contesting the eu elections. today it's the turn of change uk, so if you have a question, send them in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, or email askthis@bbc.co.uk. ben brown will put a selection of your questions to the change uk mp, chuka umunna, at 5:30pm. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can, blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year. the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie from east london.
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in the business news: 0nline giant amazon has announced a big investment in food courier deliveroo. the exact figure was not given, but amazon is the biggest investor in deliveroo's latest round of fund—raising. deliveroo said it would use the money for international expansion, improving its service and to grow its delivery—only kitchens business. airline easyjet's first—half loss before tax has increased. it blames fuel price increases, the impact of currency movements and "the impact of drones at gatwick in december". more in a moment. talks to avert the collapse of british steel will resume later on friday, after the firm secured funds to stay afloat until the end of may. sources close to owners greybull capital say its future will be discussed at "ministerial level". british steel has admitted it needs further financial support
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from the government to help it address "brexit—related issues". this lets take you through some of the big stories of the day. shares in thomas cook, which reported a £1.5 billion loss yesterday, have dropped by around 26% today, falling to just above lows in 2012 when it was fighting for survival. market analysts say the slide is because of a sell recommendation from citigroup, with a 0p target price. that is what has impacted the shares. that is what has impacted the shares. facebook has removed hundreds of social media accounts and banned an israeli firm due to "co—ordinated inauthentic behaviour", mainly targeting africa. the social network says fake accounts often posted
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about political issues, including elections in various countries. facebook has faced rising criticism for failing to stamp out misinformation on its platform. boeing has completed development of a software update for its 737 max plane, which was grounded following two fatal crashes within five months. the us plane—maker says it has flown the 737 max with the updated software on 207 flights. the federal aviation administration expects boeing to submit the upgrade for certification next week. the london market has moved a little bit lower. trade issues between china and the us have played on the
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mind of investors. the thomas cook share prices down 25% today. that after its profit warning yesterday. the easyjet share price is upjust over 3%. more on that in the easyjet share price is upjust over 3%. more on that in a moment. more on that in a moment. jeremy corbyn has said talks with the government to find a compromise over brexit "have gone as far as they can". that confirmation has pushed sterling, already touching three—month lows, at bit lower to $1.2763. low—cost carrier easyjet is having a tough time. the airline says losses increased to £275 million in the first half of the year, as the company makes less money for every seat sold. easyjet says the ongoing uncertainty over brexit has cost it some money, but also admitted that the trading environment is tough thanks to an economic slowdown in europe. also today, chief executive, johan lundgren, has defended his airline's high ticket prices to fly to madrid for the champions league joining us now is sally gethin,
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aviation analyst at gethin‘s inflight news. let's talk about the match on the 1st ofjune. a lot of airlines have raised their prices, easyjet one of them. i believe the price of a normal ticket to madrid is about £250, but fans are looking to pay £1000. the bill says it is about the man, but how can that be justified? it isa man, but how can that be justified? it is a cruel world in the airline industry. competition is everything. they are actually operating at a loss right now, so they are entitled to charge whatever prices they can, what the market can stand. there are a huge number of issues for easyjet here, aren't there, brexit, demand, the drone is due at gatwick, it is
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like the perfect storm. for easyjet, they are playing up to the idea that there are very stable low—cost carrier and they have a large fleet in europe. in fact, they are blaming external factors for their recent woes, like brexit and the drone crisis. really, they should be managing their profits, their business so they can withstand these turbulent aspects that they will come into contact with time and time again. it is rather worrying that they have increase their revenues, yet still they are operating at a widening loss. for all airlines, those losses put them right at the ends of the margins and puts them in a very vulnerable position. sadly, thank you. good to talk to you. that's all the business news for now. on saturday night, 26 countries
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will battle it out in the final of the eurovision song contest. this year's competition is being held in tel aviv, israel. co ntesta nts contestants have been told to keep the competition politics free. among those performing will be the uk's entry, 21—year—old michael rice, with his song ‘bigger than us'. yesterday, it was confirmed that madonna will also be taking to the stage to perform. joining me to talk more about this is former eurovision contestant nicki french, who is in our salford newsroom. and i'm joined via webcam by lindsay dracass, another former contestant, who is in sheffield. thank you both forjoining us. lindsay, what do you think will be in the mind of michael as he prepares for his big night? he will have a lot of rehearsing to do, but it looks like he has been having a
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lot of fun. it looks amazing. when me and nikki did it in 2,000 and 2001, the build—up to it is so amazing and overwhelming, to be honest, but i think he will be great. he will go up there and show them how it's done. what do you feel, what are your feelings and watching everybody go up for the big night, do you share that sense with thatis night, do you share that sense with that is something that has just got bigger since you were on it? oh, absolutely. and we did at there was no semifinal or anything like that. itjust went no semifinal or anything like that. it just went straight to the final with about 24 countries. now there are over 40 countries, so the build—up is at least a week longer. it is marvellous. a5 lindsayjust said, it is such a spectacle. it has to be said, they have staged it beautifully this year. what do you think of the british entry, what do
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you think of it as a song? you can be counted. i don't dislike it. i love the fact it is one of the few songs in the contest that builds really well. it builds to a good climax in the song. there are very few of them that do that this year. we could end up on the left—hand side of the scoreboard, fingers crossed! let's hear from you on that, lindsay? michael's song, there is a lot of love in that song, there is a lot of love in that song and when the chorus drops and are there, it really lifts and it is are there, it really lifts and it is a lots of love content in there, it isa a lots of love content in there, it is a song competition, so you have got tojust is a song competition, so you have got to just take it for what it is and just enjoy it. i'm sojealous, i wish i was there. will you be
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watching? yes, we watched on tuesday and last night. australia was very good. i haven't heard it. do you wa nt to good. i haven't heard it. do you want to describe it for us? she is ona want to describe it for us? she is on a pool in the air, swinging from side to side, singing opera. it is wonderfully bizarre.” side to side, singing opera. it is wonderfully bizarre. i love it. wonderfully bizarre is a good description. what of the acts that have caught your eye, because sometimes bizarre is what they go for. sometimes it is. that is why i slant a huge in the batting. not my cup of tea at all, but they are. for me, it is about the song and i love sweden, and weirdly, he has co—written our song. get that! i love swed e n co—written our song. get that! i love sweden because my country. it isa love sweden because my country. it is a very open race this year. more
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so than in many years. it is actually quite open. there are so many different favourites and it will be a great show tomorrow, it really is going to be. a good diverse selection. i wasjust about to say that. due to have sold it to me, anyway! i to say that. due to have sold it to y to say that. due to have sold it to me, anyway! i wasn't planning to watch it, but now i am! thank you both. good luck to michael rice. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. there is some sunshine developing in northern england at the moment, now that the rain has gone through. it will stay quite cloudy in southern areas this afternoon, with some outbreaks of rain. from the north midlands northwards into scotland, there will be some sunshine and that is where we will see the highest temperatures, perhaps even 20 degrees in the north and west of
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scotland. further south, it degrees in the north and west of scotland. furthersouth, it is degrees in the north and west of scotland. further south, it is a bit colder, particularly around the north sea coasts. three tonight, more we will move its way into scotland. showers down the eastern side of england. it will not be a cold night with temperatures getting new lower than about eight to 11 degrees. into the weekend, quite mixed. quite a lot of cloud. particularly on saturday in scotland. showers developing elsewhere booth on saturday and sunday. there will be some sunny spells. when you do get some sunshine, it will feel fairly warm. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories at midday: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can — blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. the divisions within the conservative party mean it is a government negotiating with no authority and no ability where i can see to actually deliver anything. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. and the prime minister is due to make a speech to party activists in the next few minutes. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year — the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie, from east london.
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for the first time in the uk, doctors successfully use keyhole surgery to treat a baby with spina bifida inside the womb. one of the world's leading experts calls for testosterone replacement therapy to be made widely available to menopausal women. we are preventing women from being mistreated by products that aren't for women. there's not going to be a tsunami of women wanting testosterone. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc newsroom live. jeremy corbyn says talks to find a compromise agreement for leaving the european union have "gone as far as they can". the labour leader has blamed the failure of negotiations on splits within the government. mr corbyn and theresa may will now attempt to agree on a process mr corbyn says theresa may has not moved her position at all.
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i've just sent the prime minister a letter to say the talks have reached what i believe to be a natural conclusion. she has announced the date she is leaving. there have been increasing noises off stage by conservative cabinet ministers and others who don't agree with much of the talks or any of the discussion we are holding, so we are concluding the talks. but have they achieved anything? the government has not moved its position fundamentally, there are fundamental disagreements. we wa nt there are fundamental disagreements. we want to have a customs arrangement with the eu that protects jobs and trade and we want to have a dynamic relationship on rights. we have put those views very strongly to the government and the withdrawal agreement bell will be brought forward. i don't know what the contents of the bill will be, we haven't seen it. how far have you discussed what sort of a negative vote should be put to parliament now? very little because we were only informed they were even thinking of indicative votes earlier this week and at that stage they we re this week and at that stage they were unable to tell me what the indicative votes would be. so this isa indicative votes would be. so this is a novel process which we will
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obviously look at whenever it comes to parliament, but the fundamental issues have to be protection of jobs, trade relations with the eu and protection of rights at work, environment and consumer protections, and of course the access to a very important european agencies. there are reports this morning that you have discussed indicative votes in detail, including on what the commons might vote on in regards to customs union. they put forward views that they are going to bring this indicative votes forward. we will obviously vote accordingly on them depending on where they fit with labour policy. but the issue has to be that the government is not fundamentally shifted its view on the divisions within the conservative party mean it isa within the conservative party mean it is a government that is negotiating with no authority and no ability that i can see to actually deliver anything. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is at westminster.
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inevitable, but a very significant day nonetheless. yes, jeremy corbyn has taken a step to pull the plug on the talks after more than six weeks of discussion between the government and labour. they were trying to do a deal that would somehow break the brexit deadlock. and as you heard there, i think his reasons to do with both the substance of what was being discussed in process itself. so on that huge stumbling block of a customs union, permanent customs arrangement with the eu, it was clear as he said there, that as far as he was concerned the government had not shifted its position on that, anything like enough. and then in the process, as he hinted out there, the divisions within the conservative party and the differences of opinion not only among the parliamentary party but in government itself on what the government itself on what the government should be doing and how brexit should look were a big frustration for labour. so as the talks moved on to potentially some sort of customs arrangement with the eu, you had figures in cabinet saying that was something that was never going to work and conservative
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mps weighing into the discussion saying that that would be a step too farfor saying that that would be a step too far for them. saying that that would be a step too farfor them. sojeremy saying that that would be a step too far for them. sojeremy corbyn outlining his reasons they're saying that these talks are not going to work and they are effectively now deadin work and they are effectively now dead in the water. the process is over, the two sides may continue to talk about what happens next because, as he sat there, in his view the issue has to return to parliament. well, in the immediate term, that means a vote on the withdrawal agreement bill, the bit of legislation that will enact the brexit deal that theresa may struck with the eu. that is scheduled to happen at the moment in the first full week ofjune, but as it stands, thatis full week ofjune, but as it stands, that is effectively a vote by mps on the substance of that deal, and as if we've seen, there is nothing like majority here in westminster for that, so it will take many minds to change for theresa may to have a chance of making progress on that basis. so where do the indicative
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votes sit in this journey? that is the big question, because it was put tojeremy the big question, because it was put to jeremy corbyn the big question, because it was put tojeremy corbyn there that the big question, because it was put to jeremy corbyn there that this the big question, because it was put tojeremy corbyn there that this is something he and the prime minister, or at least the two sides have discussed but, as you heard, he was not at all convinced of how the process would work whether in fact the government was serious about it. but that is one thing that has been discussed, about how potentially the government and labour could work together to find a majority behind one course of action here in parliament, whether that is willing in or outa parliament, whether that is willing in or out a further public vote, whether it is agreeing on a customs union relationship with the eu, and no—deal brexit potentially or a fully fledged trade deal between the two sides. but it is the nitty—gritty of how the process can work in the time available and whether it will end up with something that there is indeed a majority for, because trap parliament has tried and failed to do that several times so far. we have heard from the government and downing street in the last hour or so to get a better idea of their
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position, and on that issue of indicative votes downing street said it was considering its next steps. but the prime minister, her spokesman said this morning believes it is the duty of elected politicians to find a way to deliver on the result of the referendum, and she continues to work to secure the withdrawal agreement bill so we can leave the eu as soon as possible. let's get some reaction now from the conservative mp and prominent brexiteer, andrew bridgen. he's in our leicester studio. what is your view on the end of these talks? is it good riddance?” think it was always going to be the case that it was well choreographed by the labour party that they would wa nt to by the labour party that they would want to pull—out of after talks with the government prior to the european elections. that is for political reasons. if the labour party are true to their word and vote against the bill, i am convinced it can
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increase a number of conservative mps will vote against the withdrawal bill. it is a terrible document, surrender document, and with theresa may announcing she will stand down it would hamstring the future prime minister in any negotiations with the eu. the eu know that, they knew theresa may was a weak negotiator and they were looking to capitalise on their position through this withdrawal agreement which is actually a treaty. so in your view this will go down, if it gets voted on again trotted out i apologise, we're going to go and see what the prime minister has to say in bristol. the conservative party didn't want to be fighting these. we wanted to be out of the european union. indeed, if parliament had backed our brexit deal we could already have left the eu. but we are already have left the eu. but we are a national party, we fight national elections. and next thursday i want people to vote conservative because it is only the conservatives who can
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deliver brexit and take this country forward into a brighter future. no one else can get the job done. labour, the lib dems and snp have voted against delivering brexit again and again. nigel farage can't deliver brexit. every few years he 13°13s deliver brexit. every few years he pops up, shouts from the sidelines, he doesn't work constructively on the national interest. so if you wa nt the national interest. so if you want a party that works in the national interest, vote conservative. to vote for a party that can deliver brexit, vote conservative. to vote for a party that will take this country forward toa that will take this country forward to a brighter future, vote conservative. jeremy corbyn has said the cross—party conservative. jeremy corbyn has said the cross— party brexit conservative. jeremy corbyn has said the cross—party brexit talks have gone as far as they can and he has blamed the government and blamed the race to succeed you for undermining the negotiations. is that the cove na nt's fault the negotiations. is that the covenant's fault the talks collapsed and should you have said he will now
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stand down after the next brexit vote, has it damage these negotiations? as jeremy corbyn says, these talks have been constructive and we have made progress. there have been areas where we were able to find common ground but other issues have proven more difficult and in particular we haven't been able to overcome the fact that there isn't a common position in labour about whether they want to deliver brexit or hold a second referendum, which could reverse it. so when we come to bring the legislation forward we will think carefully about the outcome of these talks, we will also consider whether we have some votes to see if the ideas that have come through command a majority in the house of commons, but when mp5 come to vote on the bill they will be faced with a stark choice, thatis will be faced with a stark choice, that is to vote to deliver on the referendum, to vote to deliver brexit, or to shy away again from delivering brexit with all the other
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certainty —— the uncertainty that would leave. thank you. so that was a brief appearance by the prime minister. i think herfirst campaigning experience in the eu election campaign, which she did not wa nt to election campaign, which she did not want to fight at all. let's go back over to andrew. andrew, your leader they're saying vote conservative for a brighterfuture. they're saying vote conservative for a brighter future. is they're saying vote conservative for a brighterfuture. is this they're saying vote conservative for a brighter future. is this the leader you want for your eu election campaign? it is not. ithink leader you want for your eu election campaign? it is not. i think the prime minister would have been serving the country and democracy and conservative party to down some time ago. but we are where we where we are. we can't cancel elections because we don't think the conservatives will do particularly well, we are in a democracy and we have to fight the situation we find ourselves in. i will be voting conservative in the eu elections stop that is because the conservative meps who represent the east midlands are ardent believers,
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they campaigned to leave the eu and they campaigned to leave the eu and they are willing to leave with no—deal. that is not the case across the whole country, unfortunately. you will have heard the prime minister had a go at nigel farage there. how concerned are you that there. how concerned are you that the brexit party is going to take tory votes and that the tories will go down to fifth place as some opinion polls suggested? well, i warned the party when we weren't willing to leave without a deal that we we re willing to leave without a deal that we were creating a political vacuum. nature abhors a vacuum, in politics or in life. and nature nigel faraj has moved into the space vacated by the prime minister. we need to do is for the prime minister to stand down, we need a brexiteer who lives at —— believes in delivering brexit to lead the conservatives. all the conservatives had to do was leave the eu in line with our manifesto
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commitments to slay the dragon and there was no need for a dragon slayer. unfortunately the prime minister blinked when the eu were negotiating, she was not willing to live without a deal. the eu knew she was never willing to leave without a deal, that gave her no leveraging the negotiations to get a deal that is acceptable. her withdrawal agreement is not acceptable, it is not leaving the eu, it is a treaty that binds us under the control of the eu, potentially in perpetuity, andi the eu, potentially in perpetuity, and i can't vote for it, i hope the commons doesn't vote for it, we are really treading water and we need to get on now and get someone in charge of the party who believes in the project, believes in delivering on our manifesto pledges. two more questions, what do you think the withdrawal agreement, what kind of defeat you believe it will go down to in the comments if it is defeated as you expect? i'm hoping labour stick by their word. emily
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thornberry was very clear when i was interviewed with a couple of days ago that labour will vote against the withdrawal agreement. i can't speakfor other the withdrawal agreement. i can't speak for other mps on the conservative benches parade attacked there will be a lot more content is fighting against this... sorry, i have to get in, we have to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. more now from jonathan blake. we saw the prime minister saying if she knew one brexit delivered vote for us, through gritted teeth.” think you can describe it as the bare minimum she had to wanted to do in terms of campaigning for eu elections, which, as she said, she never wanted to have to take part in. but that is the reality with the delay that has happened in the
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brexit process. i think it was interesting to hear a couple of things she said in response to that question about the breakdown of the talks with labour and what it means for the process from here on. she said she would consider what had been discussed with labour when bringing forward the withdrawal agreement bell. now, will they change the text of that to include something which could tempt labour mps to vote for it? but she has to do that knowing that the very things that labour mps want to see in that withdrawal agreement bell, ideally a full customs in a relationship with the eu, maybe even the promise of a further public vote on that deal, are the very things are so many of her mps would be ready to vote against it in a heartbeat. so it is against it in a heartbeat. so it is a very difficult, delicate balancing act for her to perform, all but impossible it seems at this stage. 0n the prospect of indicative votes, parliament having a vote one after the other on various possible ways forward in the pricks brexit
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process , forward in the pricks brexit process, she said she would look at doing that at some point —— in the brexit process. if that is the way the government will go it will have to do it relatively quickly if it wa nts to do it relatively quickly if it wants it to happen before parliament gets to vote on the withdrawal agreement bill which it has to do to put the deal that theresa may we reached with the eu into law and in place in the uk. the headlines on bbc news... jeremy corbyn says is talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can, he blames the government's wea kness can, he blames the government's weakness for their collapse. this comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year. the youngest victim was 14—year—old jadon moodie from east
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london. spot now. coming up, the tottenham and england defender danny rose says and england defender danny rose says a club wanted to meet him to check he wasn't crazy. that's after his struggles with depression. rose says it happens del what happened when he spoke to an unnamed club about a potential transfer next summer. he was talking as part of a special bbc 0ne programme that men putt mental health. israel folau has been officially sacked over social media post saying hell awaits gay people. from rugby australia side that chief executive said its a regrettable incident, painful incident for rugby, they did not want to be on the situation but palau pushed on himself with his actions and ultimately they say they have to stand by their principles of
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inclusivity and respect and quite simply folau has breached the comes of co nta ct simply folau has breached the comes of contact he sight up to as a rugby australia employee. folau are saying that as a christian he has a right, as an australian as well, to express his religious views and he feels is a question it is his duty to share god's well. one side is saying it is all about freedom of religious expression and the other saying, fine, have your views but do not use your platforms to spread opinions and beliefs that could be very offensive and hurtful and harmful to so many people. and also in the process breaching the code of contact process breaching the code of co nta ct to process breaching the code of contact to which you have signed up asa contact to which you have signed up as a rugby australia employee. so sacked by rugby australia, what does that mean the folau's future and the national team? lots of things up in the airat national team? lots of things up in the air at the moment. folau could launch an appeal. 0n the one hand he said he would accept whatever his fate may be but this is a
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multi—million dollar australian by multi—million dollar australian rugby contract that he will have to forgo because of what he has done, so he will consider his options, he has 72 hours in which to consider whether to launch an appeal. he could even take to the supreme court in australia. but certainly in the foreseeable future it is very difficult to see folau playing professional sport in australia and really in the rest of the world because of the reputational damage that comes with the player. that's all for now, we'll have lots more on the bbc sport website including the latest from the us pga championships. 100 people have been stabbed to death in the uk so far this year — that's according to figures obtained by bbc news from police forces across the country. the largest group of victims are men in their twenties, as our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, reports. 100 crime scenes, 100 lost lives.
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we have been tracking murder and manslaughter in britain in 2019 and the knife is the most—used murder weapon. charlotte huggins became the first stabbing victim of 2019 on new year's day in south london. on average, there was a knife murder or manslaughter nearly every day and a half that followed. each face represents a devastated family and an expensive murder inquiry. this is a crime disproportionately affecting young people. nearly a third of victims were under 30. nearly a fifth were under 20, and that is a huge worry for the police and youth workers. in the west midlands, knife crime has risen 96% since 2013, with eight fatal knife attacks this year, along with manchester and london the highest rate in the country. here, they say, violent crime has moved beyond just those involved in gangs. it is across all people now,
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and we're seeing what used to be a small act of violence, perhaps a slap or a punch, turn into something far more serious. but two promising signs. in 95 of the 100 cases, someone has been arrested and in london the metropolitan police recently released figures suggesting a 10% fall in knife crime resulting in an injury. tom symonds, bbc news. and just after 12:30, we'll continue the discussion about these stabbing figures by speaking to kathryn morley, from 0nside youth zones — a charity which provides youth centres.
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for the first time in the uk — doctors have successfully used keyhole surgery to repair the spine of a baby with spina bifida while it was still inside the womb. the operation was performed by a team at king's college hospital in london. they say the procedure isn't a cure, but improves the baby's chances and is saferfor the mother than invasive surgery. baby jaxson is just a few weeks old, but more than two months ago, he had pioneering surgery on his spine. doctors operated onjaxson while he was still inside his mother's womb. his mum, sherrie, said it was a shock to find out he had spina bifida. it was a very high—risk pregnancy from the start anyway, through being told i couldn't have babies, and everything. so any decision we've had to make, i've made it purely for the fact that he is meant to be here. you know, it's — he'sjust — he's fought every day. it was these pregnancy scans that showed jaxson's spine and spinal cord were not developing properly. spina bifida can lead to paralysis and affect bladder and bowel control, but surgery in the womb can reduce the risk of complications later in life.
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we are operating on very delicate structures. the foetus nerves, that they are exposed, the foetus itself is very small, and we are operating on a foetus inside the womb, so obviously it's a very delicate operation. this is how it works. three small incisions were made in sherrie's bump. a thin camera and small surgical tools were inserted into her womb, then surgeons put the spinal cord back in place and put a patch over the wound. jaxson needed to be looked after in neonatal intensive care when he was born. he has not been cured, but his family hope they have given him the best start in life. he has a lot of movement in his legs, which we were told he'd have minimal movement if he didn't have the surgery, or none at all, he wouldn't be able to move them at all. i've got high hopes for him. from day one he's done things, he's amazed us all.
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the neo—nazi, jack renshaw, has been jailed for life with a minimum term of 20 years after plotting to murder labour mp rosie cooper and threatening to kill a police officer. let's cross live to the old bailey and speak to our correspondent, angus crawford. tell us more. thejudge in the sun setting mister renshaw said he was an absolutely undoubtedly dangerous offender and that what he had planned would have been an attack on democracy itself. she said she was giving him a late life sentence with a minimum of 20 years. as he was led down to the cells some of his supported shouted into the court, where with you, jack, and he replied by raising his arm in an apparent nazi salute. thank you so much.
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more than two—thirds of lgbt people say they've been sexually harassed at work but most don't report it. the survey by the tuc is believed to be the first major study into lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender people's experiences in the workplace. the government says it's starting a consultation on harassment and will ensure employers understand their legal responsibilities. 0ur lgbt correspondent ben hunte has more. patrick works in the public sector where he went through years of sexual harassment just because he is gay. i was stopped from attending an away day with colleagues. i was told that it was because the male staff were too afraid to share a shower. the teasing, discrimination and abuse that happened at the start of his career still impact him years later. i suffer from anxiety. i get very anxious. and it's just horrible. it's horrendous. and patrick is not alone. according to new research by the trades union congress, 68% of lgbt people say they have
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been sexually harassed at work. 42% of those surveyed said colleagues had made unwelcome comments or asked unwelcome questions about their sex life. 27% had received unwelcome sexual advances, and two—thirds didn't tell their employers. we need employers to step up to the mark and to take on a duty. we think it should be a legal duty to prevent sexual harassment happening in the first place. there's lots they could do in terms of policy, working with unions and educating people. i've spoken to several lgbt people who say they are not surprised by the findings in this report. in the uk, we have laws that protect people from discrimination based on their sexuality, but when it comes to applying those to workplaces, clearly more clearly needs to be done. it had a massive impact. whilst patrick has spoken up, many more lgbt people are still struggling in silence. ben hunte, bbc news.
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let's speak now to emma meehan, the assistant director for public affairs at the lgbt foundation. a lot of people in your community are not surprised, what is your view? i think the statistics and today's report is shocking but sadly not surprising. we do know that lgbt people routinely face discrimination and harassment at work but i think what this report particularly shines a light on is the levels of sexual harassment and in particular that culture of fear and silence that still seems to be particularly prevalent and is preventing people from feeling able to report that harassment. it is therefore continuing to take place. with the whole #metoo movement we are more conscious of sexual harassment in the workplace generally. do you think your community is suffering more than other parts of the demographic? i think that what this
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report shows is that there are particular types of sexual harassment that perhaps have not been covered as much by the mead to movement which has done incredible things in terms of increasing confidence and awareness around reporting, and particularly some of the stories in the report about the experiences of lesbian and bisexual women are concerning and it reveals a unique type of sexual harassment limped at lg bt a unique type of sexual harassment limped at lgbt people and that needs to be addressed by the government going forward. i suppose one issue is where you get multiple layers of discrimination, what some —— on what some call intersectional issues, gender, sexual orientation, etc, combining to create a bigger problem foran combining to create a bigger problem for an individual. and you can see from some of the stories that some
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abuses, both sexist and lgbt phobic, and employers need to be really aware that so when is being addressed, that those policies and procedures need to take into account all parts of someone's identity rather than just looking at discrimination through lgbt lens or a gender lens or ethnicity lens. and do you think the responsibilities of employers are clear enough in current legislation? i think the equality act very clearly lays out what those protected groups are, i think that where it is less clear is what are some of those practical steps that employers need to take to safeguard and protect the welfare, the health and well—being of their staff, and i think it is recognising that long—term impact on mental health that really indicates the need to do something about this, so i think there is much more that employers and the government can do on this issue. for employers watching, what would be your one message to them to get on and do
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this week, next week?” message to them to get on and do this week, next week? i think this isa this week, next week? i think this is a wake—up call, i would say to employers, bring together your lgbt employees and ask them what would work for them. in short, the lgbt people are explicitly mentioned in complaints procedures about sexual harassment and ask them what they wa nt harassment and ask them what they want because people are the experts on their own experience. good afternoon. there was a north—south split on the weather today, with the north having the better weather. 0n the north sea coasts it will be quite chilly. elsewhere, it will be a cooler day.
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particularly the west of scotland, it could make the low 20s. scotland joins into the cloudy, breezy, wet weather tonight. the rain will be quite heavy and persistent here. everywhere else, variable cloud with a few sharp showers around. the winds will turn later in the south. it will be a less cold night than it has been for the last few nights. into the weekend, a weak area of low pressure nearby, so rather cloudy with some showers. further south, there could be some sunny spells. it will be feeling warmer.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live with carrie gracie. the headlines: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can — blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. the divisions within the conservative party means that the government is negotiating with no authority and no ability that i can see to actually deliver anything. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year — the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie from east london for the first time in the uk, doctors successfully use keyhole surgery to treat a baby with spina bifida inside the womb.
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one of the world's leading experts calls for testosterone replacement therapy to be made widely available to menopausal women we are preventing women from being mistreated by products that aren't for women. there's not going to be a tsunami of women wanting testosterone. let's return to our story that 100 people have been stabbed to death in the uk so far this year, according to figures obtained by bbc news from police forces across the country. joining me now is kathryn morley, the ceo of 0nside youth zones, a charity which builds youth centres across the country. it's a charity that supports young people and gives them activities? yes, it provides aspirational places for young people to spend their leisure time. 0ften for young people to spend their leisure time. often in deprived
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communities they give young people hope and belief in themselves and their future and a huge hope and belief in themselves and theirfuture and a huge range of positive activities than positive adults around them to help them find themselves and reach adulthood more successfully. one of the things we have been hearing over and over todayis have been hearing over and over today is that that kind of activity gives young people something to do, but resources are a huge problem and since austerity these activities have become a problem. how are you fronting your youth assumes? yes, it has become much more difficult. 0ur youth assumes are planted in quite a unique way. we bring together a partnership of the local authority, local business leaders, the community and young people. by doing so we are able to fund the access. the local authority or a central pa rt the local authority or a central part of what we do, they are our strategic partner. however, by bringing in the business community
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as well, we are able to provide so much more than the local authority would be able to on their own. where we started this was by talking about the sad fact that 100 people have died asa the sad fact that 100 people have died as a result of knife winding is this year so far. do you draw a direct connection between providing activities for young people and avoiding knife crime?” activities for young people and avoiding knife crime? i think positive activities for young people area positive activities for young people a re a really positive activities for young people are a really important parts of their lives because 85% of their waking hours are spent outside of school and most of their developments outside of straightforward maths and english comes from the social activities that takes place in their lives outside school. it is really important part of growing up, what you do when you are not in school. it can influence your whole life,
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just your immediate formative years, but everything that happens in your life. being able to get involved in things that you can try out, try lots of different things, get involved in loads of different activities with all different people, make friends from across all different walks of life, that will stand you in good stead to see your life is something positive and help you find a path that is going to leave you —— lead you forward into employment and to a happy adult life. if you are a young person who doesn't have positive activities, has no options open to you, you spend your time on your estate or just on the streets or sometimes just on the streets or sometimes just trapped in your bedroom, it is very difficult to see ways to spend your time very difficult to see ways to spend yourtime and very difficult to see ways to spend your time and things that you can do that you will further your self—worth. you can find yourself doing the wrong things and getting involved in the wrong groups.
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positive activities is a really important part of helping young people find themselves and find their future. that all stands to reason. is it something that young people themselves are staying in your youth assumes, are they coming in and saying this is help me build resilience against what i might otherwise don, the mistakes i might have made? in the youth assumes there are lots of positive adults who young people are able to make great connections with, outside of family and outside of school, something much more relaxed. they are able to have conversations about what they might be doing otherwise are what they had been doing in the past. young people are worried about their own safety. that is the biggest reason why young people would carry a knife, because they are worried that they need to defend themselves. we need to help them
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feel confident and inspired and safe enough to be knife free. we will have to leave it there, but we wish you all the best and all the best of the young people you're trying to help. thank very much. well, 2019's 100 fatal stabbings in the uk have been documented on the bbc news website. the page is updated as police investigations into the killings progress and when court proceedings get underway. it's just under a week to go now until voters go to the polls in the european elections. with campaigning is gearing up with the main parties up and down the country, what are voters making of it so far? the bbc‘s political editor in the west midlands, patrick burns, has been reporting from two very
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different parts of the region. yesterday, he was in north staffordshire, where two—thirds voted leave. today, he's in gloucestershire, on the southern edge of his region, where most voters supported the remain campaign. setting out their stall in cheltenham to keep britain in the eu. hello, have you decided how you're voting in the elections? no? would you like a leaflet? 0k. this may seem a difficult sell in our bbc midlands region, where everyone else except warwick combined three years ago to register britain's biggest proportion of leave vote by a ratio of 6—4. not here — 56% revolted remain in cheltenham. one of the biggest challenges is people don't really understand what the eu does and they explicitly don't understand that in terms of the investment that is made in the midlands by the eu in terms of regeneration and our contribution to the economy.
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really, this is, for some of us, i suppose, a proxy referendum, an opportunity to show in formalised way whether or not the remain vote is as strong as we feel it has become. if remains what is really strengthening here, there is precious little enthusiasm for any compromise or middle ground options. so for the political high ground, let's head for the hills. moreton in marsh, gateway to the cotswold hills, which give their name to the constituency next door. it voted remain, as well, and surprise, surprise, liberal democrats have just taken control of the council from the conservatives. people ought to have another vote, to be honest, because i don't particularly want to leave europe. we get far too much from the farage clan saying how bad the eu is. we have to change our prime minister, she is needing
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to take a step down. she's had long enough. kick on. it's a congested marketplace for the remain vote. the lib dems combining with the green and change uk present a bewildering array of choices for the voters at this historic crossroads. that was patrick burns in the west midlands, which in the last european elections in 2014 voted in two conservative meps, two labour meps and three ukip meps. this compares to the east midlands, who elected two conservative meps, one labour and one ukip. let's go now to mansfield to speak to our east midlands political editor. tony, how is it looking this time? well, to ukip, i have to correct you
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there, the last time around. mansfield is one of those areas that voted heavily in favour of leaving the eu, by 70% to 30%. the brexit party is in town today, preaching to those who already agree with them that we should be leaving the eu. there is no room for the compromises you heard patrick talked about in the report earlier. it is an interesting place to be politically, mansfield. in the local elections, they elected a labour mayor who defeated an independent. at the last general election, they returned for the first time a conservative mp and charged him with delivering crankset, which obviously hasn't happened yet. what do you detect of the mood then? is it angry or determined or both? there is a bit of both. i was talking to people the
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other day in the marketplace, fairly early in the morning, and you asked them what the main political story was that they wanted a dressing and pretty much everyone was saying homelessness. they were talking about things relating to them here in the tyne. brexit, somebody said, every time they heard it on a news bulletin, they pressed the mute button. turning to the brexit party, they are trying to convince them they are trying to convince them they are trying to convince them they are the right ones to do that. we have labour making a comeback locally by winning the mayor for the first time, and a conservative mp, and the conservatives trying to make inroads here. it is all very interesting. what happens in the boot next week? mansfield last time around was the most backing for ukip than anywhere else in the east midlands. so what of the remainers,
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are they invisible, have they given 7 are they invisible, have they given up? i don't think they have given up, they are campaigning in other areas in the east midlands. change uk with very much in east midlands base with anna seabury and chris leslie, both mps and nottinghamshire. they have been on the campaign trail, too. they may pick up some votes from those who see them as an option. the lib dems are making a comeback in the east midlands, winning at council seat in leicestershi re midlands, winning at council seat in leicestershire earlier this month. they now have two councils which they run. they are making a comeback, we will see how it happens next week, whether they can make a comeback or whether their vote will be split. the remain vote will be split between the lib dems, change uk, the greens, they could be squeezed out by both of them. thank you, tony.
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remember that all this week we've been interviewing representatives from parties contesting the eu elections. today it's the turn of change uk, so if you have a question, send them in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, or email us at bbc.co.uk. ben brown will put a selection of your questions to the change uk mp chuka umunna at 5.30pm. the headlines on bbc news: jeremy corbyn says his party's talks with the government to find a brexit compromise have gone as far as they can, blaming the government's weakness for their collapse. it comes as theresa may agrees to set a timetable for her to step down as prime minister, after the next commons vote on brexit in a few weeks' time. 100 people have died from knife wounds so far this year — the youngest victim was 14—year—old jayden moodie from east london
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next week will mark two years since the bomb at the manchester arena which killed 22 people. the youngest victim was eight—year—old saffie roussos, who was at the concert with her mum, lisa. lisa was badly injured in the attack, but after extensive surgery and rehabilitation she is preparing to walk the route of the great manchester run this weekend. alongside her husband, andrew, she has given her first broadcast interview to our north of england correspondent judith moritz. i don't really remember a lot. i remember leaving, and saffie had got my hand, this hand, and she was pulling, jumping about. my arm was outstretched, holding her hand as she was pulling me, and the next minute ijust hit the floor with a thud. ijust remember lying there and trying to move.
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i wasjust phys... i was just paralysed. i couldn't move a finger, i couldn't move at all. i could blink. ijust kept thinking to myself, just keep your eyes open. and when somebody finally spoke to me and started moving me, they asked me my name, and ijust said saffie. that's all i could get out. i wanted to say, "will you just go and find saffie?" then i must have gone again, because the next time, i remember them cutting myjeans off, and that was the last thing i remembered until i woke up. how many weeks later? six weeks. six weeks later. what happened at that point? andrew was with you. andrew was with me, and i can remember thinking, "well, why has he not mentioned saffie?" and i knew, ijust knew. i thought, if i'm this badly hurt, and she was a tiny eight—year—old, then what chance would she have? like an intuition? yes.
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did you ask the question? i said, "she's gone, isn't she?" it is a painful moment. i can't talk about it. because it is so raw, and it is two years on. it makes no difference at all, does it? no, it doesn't. still like yesterday. i feel like we're stuck in 2017. yeah, you do. it's amazing how these two years have gone by, but when sometimes we talk amongst each other, you're stuck in 2017. and for you over the last two years, balancing your bereavement, your loss, with your recovery, how have those two things been possible? ifelt like i needed to be strong, and i needed to be the best i could be before i could deal
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with the loss of saffie. i had to learn to walk again. the first few steps around the ward, i felt like i'd run a marathon, didn't i? i was out of breath, sweating. it was only about five steps. the hand, i think the progress is a lot slower with my hand. that's been reconstructed ? it's been reconstructed, yes. there's still a lot of numbness in it, and nerve damage. taking part in the great manchester run has given you a goal, has it? yes, it's let me look further into the future than i normally do. and it's the start of the charity, the launch of the charity, so it's all good and positive. the charity needs to be there to help victims of terrorism. there is no help. do you feel let down? by the government, definitely. it was offered — £5,500 each for the death of saffie.
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through the compensation scheme? through the compensation scheme, that's the maximum. it's a complete insult. taking part in the run in manchester, how will that feel, do you think, being back here? i know it's going to be emotional, not just for me, for all of us that's walking. weekend but it's a good thing, and we need — we need it, don't we? something good's got to come out of something so awful. it's got to. days as time coverage of the great manchester run will be presented by gabby logan, live on bbc2 from 12pm on sunday, with a highlights programme to follow at 5pm. this week bbc news has been talking about the menopause. one of the most high—profile campaigners about the menopause is meg matthews. we caught up with her and her
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daughter, anais gallagher, about the impact it can have on the whole family. so, you know i've been going through the menopause for about the last few years? yes. how have you been finding it? i mean, recently it's been all right. i think you've sort of... maybe come through the other side? you're a lot more calm than... definitely at the beginning you were really stressed out, and you were really stressful to be around. yeah, i think i was. you were very overemotional. yeah, i know. i mean, my anxiety was, like, through the roof. yeah. and, yeah, i would just watch something like eastenders and i would burst into tears, and you're not that sort of person at all. no, not at all. and also with your hormones kicking in, which you hated me saying... 0h... that was your pet hate. yeah, it was. i did find, like, you know, little things really wound me up. so, like, you know... i found that, too. your room, i always had a thing about your room was never tidy. yeah.
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but looking back on it, it was all stuff that was really going on with me. i would look for anything. i've always been very a fussy eater. thank you. and you knew that i liked fish pie, and in your weirdly messed up menopausal brain you were like, "she likes fish pie, let me buy fish pie for every night of the week." so then you bought seven fish pies and i opened the fridge and i was like, "why are there so many fish pies?" and you just started crying. and i started crying, i know. also, like, quite... you need to tell your children about it, because if you don't know about the menopause, you'll just think that they're having a mental breakdown. but when i found out that it was medical then i wasn't that concerned. but you're... you know, you're very grown—up for your age, i must say. yeah, i think so. very mature and we can talk about everything, so... so it was really easy for us, i think. i know you're in your own head when you're going through the menopause and you can't really think about the bigger picture but, like, at the end of the day, however much you're stressed out and you think that, you kno "
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yeah? your number one job and priority is to be a mother. the thing is, i don't think any mums actually do that. they still get on with their life. yeah, that's what i'm saying, you'vejust got to... but your head and everything is so difficult, so hard. but also, like, having... i don't know, from my point of view it like, you know, as a teenager or a kid, just be understanding, don't take the situation too seriously, the light—hearted. help them to, like, have fun. just talk. yeah, it's all about talking and sharing and being honest. that's my main piece of advice, is just talk. and sharing. no worries. thank you. i love you lots. i love you too, nais—nais. it's that time of the year. yes, the 64th eurovision song contest will take place this weekend in tel aviv. 200 million people will tune in to enjoy 26 songs competing
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the show is taking place in israel this year, at a time of renewed tension on the border with gaza, but contestants have been told to keep the competition politics free. david sillito has more. eurovision — the fans are here... the rehearsals are under way... and representing the uk is michael rice. it's lovely to meet you. nice to meet you. lovely to meet you. # it's bigger than us.# who wasn't even born the last time the uk won. but, having spent the last few months on a tour of europe, he has already got a taste of eurovision fame. i never in a million years thought i'd have fans, so to go to these countries and see everyone there waiting outside hotels for days just to get a photo of me, it's crazy. eurovision very much prides itself on being a celebration
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of inclusiveness, but the question this year will be very much about exactly who is going to be coming to the party. this is iceland's hatari, who are... award—winning anti—capitalist doomsday techno. and they had doubts about playing in israel, given the political situation, but felt they could make more of a statement by coming. however... you've been told no politics on stage? yes. which is impossible, and a paradox. have you been told to stop talking about politics offstage? yes, but the line is blurry. we've been warned. but, while there has been talk of boycotts and protests, so far it has actually been pretty much business as usual for israel's eurovision party. david sillito, bbc news, tel aviv.
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there is more cloud around today than yesterday, and it will feel cooler. it is not all of the country. in northern scotland that will be another sunny and warm day. that is because the north is closer to this area of high pressure. this week weather font will bring outbreaks of rain further south. also more of the breeze and eastern areas. well you have the cloud further south, it will feel cooler, but some glorious sunshine in scotland, particularly the north—west corner, where we could see temperatures into the low 20s. further south, the mid—teens at best, cooler than that on the north sea coast. 0vernight, it looks like
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scotla nd sea coast. 0vernight, it looks like scotland joined zen as well with the cloudy, breezy and wet weather. some of this rain could be persistent in the second part of the night. further south, cloud around, some sharp showers, but the temperatures will be milder than the last few nights. into the weekend, this area of low pressure is affecting the continent but also our shores, bringing in easterly or north—easterly winds. there will be clwyd brought in on that, but there will also be some good spells of sunshine, with any of them will send the best of this. this is the picture for saturday, long spells of rain across scotland. some of it to be quite happy. further south, a better chance of some sunshine and it will feel warm in the sunshine with very light winds. the temperatures as they rise could set off if few heavy, slow—moving perhaps thundery showers. they will be hit and miss. into some day,
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still a weak area of low pressure, so light winds up and down the uk, including northern areas. variable clwyd, a few showers that are likely to fall over the higher ground in central and northern areas. 20 degrees or so across the south, may bea degrees or so across the south, may be a degree or so higherfurther north because the winds will be lighter. into the new week, it looks like it will stay largely settled with quite a bit of sunshine. there is always the chance of some showers, which could be happy. —— heavy.
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1:00 pm
cross—party talks on brexit between labour and the government collapse without agreement. both sides blame each other asjeremy corbyn pulls the plug on six weeks of negotiations. he claims the government is weak and unstable the divisions within the conservative party mean it is a government negotiating with no authority and no ability that i can see to actually deliver anything. we haven't been able to overcome the fact that there isn't a common position in labour about whether they want to deliver brexit or hold a second referendum which could reverse it. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime... the cost of britain's knife crime crisis — 100 lives so far this year, most of them male and under 30.

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